Monday 11th April was another sad day for the British coal industry, as a landmark next to the A1 in Nottinghamshire was finally dismantled. Harworth colliery, south of Doncaster, was brought down a day later than planned. Hundreds of people went home disappointed on Sunday 10th April when the explosives lined inside the pit head refused to go off. It was one last proud, defiant stand by this relic of a bygone era.

Harworth, like many, was a proud colliery. I remember one of my lecturers at College, who was an ex-Harworth miner, telling the class some facts about his former pit. One of them was at that time the pit head was the tallest in Europe. Another, that the coal the Flying Scotsman used on its record breaking London to Edinburgh journey in 1932 was all from Harworth. Whether these facts are true or not doesn’t matter, what is more important is that the men who worked at Harworth are proud to tell these stories. They are proud of what they did and proud of the coal they dug up.

This was the pit my great grandad worked down, my grandma’s uncles and brother also worked in its depths. It has a place in my family’s history and many others too. It was a local landmark, next to the A1 and could be seen for miles around.  With nearby Maltby Colliery, which is also no longer standing, both towers could be seen for miles and both were like huge industrial behemoths, in a standoff in the Nottinghamshire/South Yorkshire landscapes.

I have recently been talking to many ex-miners from Harworth and Bircotes in relation to their original Vibration White Finger claims, reinvestigating those claims to see if they too did not receive all they were entitled to. As part of the Vibration White Finger Professional Negligence Department at Jordans Solicitors we are recovering £1000’s for ex-miners whose original claims were under-settled. If you believe that your claim for Vibration White Finger may have been under-settled, give me or my colleagues a call, free on 03303 001103 to see how we can help.

 

Alan Bean


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